Overview

What is Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It is diagnosed when higher than normal blood glucose levels first appear during pregnancy. Most women will no longer have diabetes after the baby is born. However, some women will continue to have high blood glucose levels after delivery.

Symptoms

What are the signs of Gestational Diabetes?

For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. Increased thirst and increased frequent urination are possible symptoms.

Causes

What are the causes of Gestational Diabetes?

During pregnancy, hormone levels change, making it harder for your body to process blood sugar efficiently. This may cause your blood glucose levels to rise. Some other risk factors associated with gestational diabetes include:

Overweight/obesity

Overweight/obesity

Age older than 40 years

Age older than 40 years

Low levels of physical activity

Low levels of physical activity

Previous gestational diabetes or prediabetes

Previous gestational diabetes or prediabetes

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Family history

Family history

Delivering a previous child of large birth weight

Delivering a previous child of large birth weight

Ethnicity - Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander, Indian or Chinese, African American, Hispanic American, and Native American descent

Ethnicity - Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander, Indian or Chinese, African American, Hispanic American, and Native American descent

Diagnosis

How do I know if I have Gestational Diabetes?

To diagnose gestational diabetes, your doctor is likely to ask you about your medical and family history, perform a physical assessment and/or request the following tests:

Fasting insulin

Fasting insulin

Insulin Resistance Index

Insulin Resistance Index

Glycoslyated Haemoglobin (HbA1c)

Glycoslyated Haemoglobin (HbA1c)

Find a Practitioner

See a list of practitioners who specialise in Gestational Diabetes