Overview

What is Andropause (Low Testosterone)?

Andropause or androgen deficiency, is a condition that is associated with the decrease in the male hormone testosterone. It has also been referred to as "male menopause". Testosterone is the hormone that is responsible for the typical changes involved in male puberty, such as:

- Growth of your muscle mass - Growth of your body hair

- Lowering of your voice

- Changes in your sexual functioning

As men get older, the level of testosterone in the body and production of sperm gradually becomes lower, and they experience physical and psychological symptoms as a result of these low levels.

Symptoms

What are the signs of Andropause (Low Testosterone)?

Low testosterone can cause physical, sexual, and psychological problems for both men and women. They typically worsen as you get older. They can include:

Low energy / fatigue

Low energy / fatigue

Depression or sadness

Depression or sadness

Decreased motivation

Decreased motivation

Lowered self-confidence

Lowered self-confidence

Difficulty concentrating

Difficulty concentrating

Insomnia or disturbed sleeping

Insomnia or disturbed sleeping

Increased body fat

Increased body fat

Reduced muscle mass and feelings of weakness

Reduced muscle mass and feelings of weakness

Gynecomastia ("Man boobs")

Gynecomastia ("Man boobs")

Decreased bone density

Decreased bone density

Erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction

Reduced libido

Reduced libido

 Infertility

Infertility

Causes

What are the causes of Andropause (Low Testosterone)?

Lowered testosterone is a natural part of the aging process and it is estimated that testosterone decreases about 10% every decade after men reach the age of 30. However, there are many other potential causes of low testosterone, including the following:

Injury or infection of the testes

Injury or infection of the testes

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy

Dysfunction or tumors of the pituitary gland

Dysfunction or tumors of the pituitary gland

Medications and corticosteroids

Medications and corticosteroids

Alcohol abuse

Alcohol abuse

Cirrhosis of the liver

Cirrhosis of the liver

Chronic renal (kidney) failure

Chronic renal (kidney) failure

HIV/AIDS

HIV/AIDS

Klinefelter syndrome (a genetic condition in which a male is born with an extra copy of the X chromosome)

Klinefelter syndrome (a genetic condition in which a male is born with an extra copy of the X chromosome)

Obesity or extreme weight loss

Obesity or extreme weight loss

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes

Congenital defect

Congenital defect

Obstructive sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea

Oestrogen excess

Oestrogen excess

Previous anabolic steroid abuse

Previous anabolic steroid abuse

Trauma (head injury)

Trauma (head injury)

Radiation exposure

Radiation exposure

Diagnosis

How do I know if I have Andropause (Low Testosterone)?

To diagnose low testosterone, your doctor is likely to ask you about your medical and family history, perform a physical exam or request the following tests:

Full blood count (FBC)

Full blood count (FBC)

Male hormone profile

Male hormone profile

Oestrogen metabolites

Oestrogen metabolites

Find a Practitioner

See a list of practitioners who specialise in Andropause (Low Testosterone)